Taking the “No-plunger” Plunge.

The Case for the Marine Composting Toilet.

There are three ways to suddenly get a lot of water in the bilge. Being holed, being rolled and having the large bore thru-hull to the head fail. All three have the potential of sinking your boat. But sinking your boat is a long shot. Much more likely are the other negative aspects of the marine head. Few things can cause more distress or potential havoc on board a boat than the head.  There are more than enough discouraging and disgusting events caused by a marine head to give it the bad reputation it so richly deserves. Being filled with poop makes these problems exponentially worse.

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For the DIYer – the Urine Diverter Assembly (UDA)

I am occasionally approached by a customer that only wants to buy the urine diverting portion of the toilet. They may have an installation problem that prevents the use of the entire toilet. This seems to be common in sailboats under 40 feet and some Airstream travel trailers in particular. The Urine Diverter Assembly (UDA) is basically the urine funnel, housing lid, sealing lid and toilet seat portion of the C-Head toilet. It can also include the churning bucket and churn handle. Installation of the UDA does require some important and exact alignment with the urine capturing device. The urine capturing device can be as simple as a plastic jug or a complex as a reservoir for pumping the urine out to a holding tank or drain field if it is not a gravity feed plumbing system.

Urine Diverter Assembly
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Why there is no odor.

As hard as it may be to believe, if used correctly, compact composting toilets don’t stink.

Anchorman – Youtube

There are basically three reasons that people who travel on boats or RVs use compact composting toilets. First, they don’t consume valuable resources, second, there is no urgency to find a dump or pump-out station, and thirdly, they don’t smell. This is big medicine. The first two reasons are intuitive. That they don’t smell is more difficult to believe. So let’s take a look at exactly what is happening and why they don’t smell, at least like sewage. I can’t speak with regard to my competitors, but used correctly, a C-Head has no odor when closed up, even without ventilation. When you open the lid you will get a mild smell of whatever medium you are using in its composting state. Pine smells different than coco coir and different than aspen bedding. None of them are particularly unpleasant but the owner may have a preference. I do. Ad to that the fact that deodorizers can be added to the small basket in the collection bucket to give the toilet a desired smell. Mothballs will make it smell like a public restroom. Essential oils and air fresheners will give it another smell. A single spray of Febreze prior to sitting down will have you pooping in a bed of lilacs. My next experiment is sandalwood.

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Composting Toilet Vlog Review #1

And my comments of Texas Tramper comments on the C-Head.

This is one of the better and more accurate reviews I have seen to date.

Texas Tramper – Vlog Site

Of course, it would appeal to me because she gives the C-Head a nice review, but I don’t disagree with her assessment of my competitor. I would like to address some of her observations about the C-Head. She clearly has done her homework and has experience with a compact, composting toilet. The first five minutes are devoted to issues she is having with the current composting toilet she is using. It is instructive. Here are my observations on her comments regarding the C-Head.

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