The Components of a BoonJon Garden – Part 1

How it all works

In a true permaculture setting, there is no such thing as waste and the same is true for bodily waste. Everything gets used. Keeping in mind that a BoonJon Garden is designed for managing organic waste as well as providing food, let’s look at the elements of the garden and the things that effect the design of your garden. It is important to remember the goal of your garden, which is to provide system for turning carbon based waste back into food and successfully managing the hazards associated with managing organic waste. It is an ongoing learning process. Aside from neighbors and local government, there are three major natural factors that will effect the design of your garden; local climate, the lay of the land, local fauna and flora.

Part of my BoonJon Garden

Local climate is obviously going to be a major factor. People gardening in northern climes are subject to greater seasonal changes than do we here in the south. While the cold has an adverse effect on growing vegetables, raising soldier flies and composting, so does the heat in the summer. I live in north central Florida, so subtropic is the baseline of my experience but if the Solar Minimum is for real then we may be in for colder weather. More about that in a future blog. I hope that this blog site will stimulate a lot of conversation on gardening in the north and we will have a bunch of creative ideas on how best to carry out a BoonJon garden when dealing with show and freezing temperatures. But I am basically going to lay out how my garden has developed over the years and to the degree it is applicable to other climates, I hope the reader finds it useful.

If you live in the high desert, or mountains or in the low country or the hill country or in the forest; your soil, the rain, the wind, the humidity and the daylight hours are all going to be significant factors as to how easy or difficult it is to create a permaculture environment and manage your waste. In addition, how you manage your pee and poop, collect your water, grow food and generate your heat, etc. will all impact the garden and your waste management system.

The babies are worse than the adults because they are cute.

And finally, the local fauna and flora will be working either for or against you and you will have to take measures to either promote or discourage these things from invading your space and reeking havoc with your gardening system. Here in north central Florida, bees, black soldier flies, snakes and raptors are all huge assets to my garden. Bears, mice, squirrels, raccoons, etc, not so much. Especially bears, which are protected and once they discover easy sources of food can be very damaging and persistent to a aggravating degree. I will be going over all of these aspects in following posts. We will talk about raised beds and buckets, black soldier flies, compost towers, burning and dehydrating waste and a host of other interesting topics. I will attach links below as they develop. Please feel free to ask questions or comment.

Copyright 2019 – C-Head LLC – All rights reserved on all content.

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